Call for Presentations: BSD devroom at FOSDEM 2014


November 16, 2013 posted by Benny Siegert

FOSDEM 2014 will take place on 1–2 February, 2014, in Brussels, Belgium. Just like in the last years, there will be both a BSD booth and a developer's room (on Saturday).

The topics of the devroom include all BSD operating systems. Every talk is welcome, from internal hacker discussion to real-world examples and presentations about new and shiny features. The default duration for talks will be 45 minutes including discussion. Feel free to ask if you want to have a longer or a shorter slot.

If you already submitted a talk last time, please note that the procedure is slightly different.

To submit your proposal, visit

https://penta.fosdem.org/submission/FOSDEM14/

and follow the instructions to create an account and an “event”. Please select “BSD devroom” as the track. (Click on “Show all” in the top right corner to display the full form.)

Please include the following information in your submission:

  • The title and subtitle of your talk (please be descriptive, as titles will be listed with ~500 from other projects)
  • A short abstract of one paragraph
  • A longer description if you wish to do so
  • Links to related websites/blogs etc.

The deadline for submissions is December 20, 2013. The talk committee, consisting of Daniel Seuffert, Marius Nünnerich and Benny Siegert, will consider the proposals. If yours has been accepted, you will be informed by e-mail before the end of the year.

[1 comment]

 

Google Summer of Code 2013 report: Defragmentation for FFS


October 11, 2013 posted by Thomas Klausner

The following report is by Manuel Wiesinger:

First of all, I like to thank the NetBSD Foundation for enabling me to successfully complete this Google Summer of Code. It has been a very valuable experience for me.

My project is a defragmentation tool for FFS. I want to point out at the beginning that it is not ready for use yet.

What has been done:

Fragment analysis + reordering. When a file is smaller or equal than the file system's fragment size, it is stored as a fragment. One can think of a fragment as a block. It can happen that there are many small files that occupy a fragment. When the file systems changes over time it can happen that there are many blocks containing fewer fragments than they can hold. The optimization my tool does is to pack all these fragments into fewer blocks. This way the system may get a little more free space.

Directory optimization. When a directory gets deleted, the space for that directory and its name are appended to the previous directory. This can be imagined like a linked list. My tool reads that list and writes all entries sequentially.

Non-contiguous files analysis + reordering strategy. This is what most other operating systems call defragmentation - a reordering of blocks, so that blocks belonging to the same file or directory can be read sequentially.

[Read More] [1 comment]

 

NetBSD 6.1.2 and NetBSD 6.0.3 are out!


September 30, 2013 posted by Jeff Rizzo

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6.1.2, the second security/bugfix update of the NetBSD 6.1 release branch, and NetBSD 6.0.3, the third security/bugfix update of the NetBSD 6.0 release branch. They represent a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, and if you are running a prior release of NetBSD 6.x3, you are recommended to update.

For more details, please see the NetBSD 6.1.2 release notes or NetBSD 6.0.3 release notes.

Complete source and binaries for NetBSD 6.1.2 and NetBSD 6.0.3 are available for download at many sites around the world. A list of download sites providing FTP, AnonCVS, SUP, and other services may be found at http://www.NetBSD.org/mirrors/.

[2 comments]

 

NetBSD 5.2.1 and NetBSD 5.1.3 patch releases


September 28, 2013 posted by Jeff Rizzo

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 5.2.1, the first security/bugfix update of the NetBSD 5.2 release branch, and NetBSD 5.1.3, the third security/bugfix update of the NetBSD 5.1 release branch. They represent a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, and if you are running a release of NetBSD prior to 5.1.3, you are recommended to update to a supported NetBSD 5.x or NetBSD 6.x version.

For more details, please see the NetBSD 5.2.1 release notes or NetBSD 5.1.3 release notes.

Complete source and binaries for NetBSD 5.2.1 and NetBSD 5.1.3 are available for download at many sites around the world. A list of download sites providing FTP, AnonCVS, SUP, and other services may be found at http://www.NetBSD.org/mirrors/.

Updates to NetBSD 6.x will be coming in the next few days.

[1 comment]

 

Firefox on sparc64 update


September 23, 2013 posted by Martin Husemann

Just a small update on the previous post about firefox on sparc64: after a bit more work, the brand new version 24 ESR builds straight from pkgsrc (so should be included in the next set of binary pkgs).

All open issues (wrong colours on scaled images, failing https, ...) have been resolved.

Here is a new screeenshot:

[3 comments]

 

PCI driver support for rump kernels on Xen


September 18, 2013 posted by Antti Kantee

Yesterday I wrote a serious, user-oriented post about running applications directly on the Xen hypervisor. Today I compensate for the seriousness by writing a why-so-serious, happy-buddha type kernel hacker post. This post is about using NetBSD kernel PCI drivers in rump kernels on Xen, with device access courtesy of Xen PCI passthrough.

[Read More] [2 comments]

 

Running applications on the Xen Hypervisor


September 17, 2013 posted by Antti Kantee

There are a number of motivations for running applications directly on top of the Xen hypervisor without resorting to a full general-purpose OS. For example, one might want to maximally isolate applications with minimal overhead. Leaving the OS out of the picture decreases overhead, since for example the inter-application protection offered normally by virtual memory is already handled once by the Xen hypervisor. However, at the same time problems arise: applications expect and use many services normally provided by the OS, for example files, sockets, event notification and so forth. We were able to set up a production quality environment for running applications as Xen DomU's in a few weeks by reusing hundreds of thousands of lines of unmodified driver and infrastructure code from NetBSD. While the amount of driver code may sound like a lot for running single applications, keep in mind that it involves for example file systems, the TCP/IP stack, stdio, system calls and so forth -- the innocent-looking open() alone accepts over 20 flags which must be properly handled. The remainder of this post looks at the effort in more detail.

[Read More] [5 comments]

 

NetBSD 6.1.1 released


August 22, 2013 posted by Soren Jacobsen

The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 6.1.1, the first security/bugfix update of the NetBSD 6.1 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons.

For more details, please see the 6.1.1 release notes.

Complete source and binaries for NetBSD 6.1.1 are available for download at many sites around the world. A list of download sites providing FTP, AnonCVS, SUP, and other services may be found at http://www.NetBSD.org/mirrors/.

[2 comments]

 

SX support added


July 03, 2013 posted by Michael Lorenz

Support for Sun's SX rendering engine ( found in the SparcStation 20 and 10SX's memory controllers ) has been added, both for the console and X. Both drivers support basic acceleration ( block copy, rectangle fill, character drawing in the kernel ), the Xorg driver also supports Xrender acceleration. This probably makes SX the oldest supported hardware which can do that.

[Read More] [0 comments]

 

Google Code-In 2012/2013 (from jdf)


July 02, 2013 posted by Matthew Sporleder

Google Code-In (GCi) is a project like Google Summer Of Code (GSoC), but for younger students. While GSoC is aimed at university students, i.e. for people usually of age 19 or older, GCi wants to recruit pupils for Open Source projects.

When applying for participation, every project had to create a large number of potentially small tasks for students. A task was meant to be two hours of work of an experienced developer, and feasible to be done by a person 13 to 18 years old. Google selected ten participating organisations (this time, NetBSD was the only BSD participating) to insert their tasks into Google Melange (the platform which is used for managing GCi and GSoC).

Then, the students registered at Google Melange, chose a project they wanted to work on, and claimed tasks to do. There were many chats in the NetBSD code channel for students coming in and asking questions about their tasks.

After GCi was over, every organisation had to choose their two favourite students who did the best work. For NetBSD, the choice was difficult, as there were more than two students doing great work, but in the end we chose Mingzhe Wang and Matthew Bauer. These two "grand price winners" were given a trip to Mountain View to visit the Google headquarters and meet with other GCi price winners.

You can see the results on the corresponding wiki page

There were 89 finished tasks, ranging from research tasks (document how other projects manage their documentation), creating howtos, trying out software on NetBSD, writing code (ATF tests and Markdown converters and more), writing manpages and documentation, fixing bugs and converting documentation from the website to the wiki.

Overall, it was a nice experience for NetBSD. On the one hand, some real work was done (for many of them, integration is still pending). On the other hand, it was a stressful time for the NetBSD mentors supervising the students and helping them on their tasks. Especially, we had to learn many lessons (you will find them on the wiki page for GCi 2012), but next time, we will do much better. We will try to apply again next year, but we will need a large bunch of new possible tasks to be chosen again.

So if you think you have a task which doesn't require great prior knowledge, and is solvable within two hours by an experienced developer, but also by a 13-18 year old within finite time, feel free to contact us with an outline, or write it directly to the wiki page for Code-In in the NetBSD wiki.

[1 comment]

 

jdf's Summer of Code project


June 27, 2013 posted by Matthew Sporleder

Julian Djamil Fagir wrote a blog post about his GSoC project

As one of five, I've been chosen for participating in Google Summer Of Code (GSoC) this year for NetBSD. My project is to write a binary upgrade tool for NetBSD, optionally with a “live update” functionality.

Why an upgrade tool? – Yes, updating currently is easy. You download the set tarballs from a mirror, unpack the kernel, reboot, unpack the rest, reboot, and done. But this is an exhausting procedure, and you have to know that there are actually updates, and what they affect.

read more
[0 comments]

 

Support for Marvell Armada XP


May 30, 2013 posted by Radoslaw Kujawa

NetBSD now includes support for Marvell Armada XP SoCs. The port was done by Semihalf and sponsored by Marvell, who have generously agreed to release the source code.

This work was integrated into the NetBSD/evbarm port. The kernel for Armada XP is built from the "ARMADAXP" configuration.

Currently supported hardware include Marvell DB-MV784MP-GP development boards. Adding support for more Armada XP-based boards should be relatively easy.

The port includes support for the PJ4B CPU core and most of the SoC's peripherals:

  • UART
  • SATA
  • PCI Express
  • I2C
  • SPI
  • USB

SMP and on-chip Ethernet are not supported yet (however it is possible to use a PCI Express based Ethernet card). [1 comment]